The world's first hydrogen-powered superyacht

Project description

Hydrogen Viking is owned by Green Yacht, a company specializing in the development of emission-free energy solutions for the maritime sector. The boat will be used to test a full-scale energy system and will demonstrate the possibilities that lie in utilizing hydrogen as a power source for fast-moving yachts.

Our goal is to be the first player in the world with a multi-megawatt and approximately 100-foot vessel that can achieve high speeds without having to rely on fossil fuels as a back-up energy source solution. The boat will act as a technology demonstrator and should pave the way for other projects. Green Yacht, therefore, looks forward to creating a zero-emission vessel that will lead the way in reaching the world's sustainability goals in the maritime sector.

The incredible journey

- from dictatorship to democracy

Hydrogen Viking is a Sunseeker Predator 95-100, 2005. It was produced in Poole, UK. The boat was bought new by the Gaddafi family and went by the name Che Guevara. Although this is a sensational part of the boat's history, it has no real impact on the boat's purpose today. What is of importance, however, is that the vessel has been ideal for the project as the boat's hull has an ideal size for testing, is built for speed, and has a spacious engine compartment that can be used for the installation of new technology.

The boat is now located in Bergen, Norway, and we are well on our way to create the world's first pure hydrogen vessel of this size that is built to achieve great speed.

The vessel is at sea ready to be shipped from Malta.

The boat arrives in Bergen and is placed at Solheimsviken for a long time, waiting to be hoisted up on land.

The vessel is hoisted on land by Bergen's Port Authority in Jekteviken,  Bergen.

The move required some adjustments at the Greenstat hangar at Laksevåg where, among other things, the hangar's entrance had to be raised

And the support beams had to be lowered.

After a long journey, "Che Guevarra" has reached its end station and a new, hydrogen-powered, adventure has begun.

The use of Hydrogen Viking

The boat will serve as a testing facility for different players for many years to come.

The idea is that the boat's main area will be converted into a conference room with approx. 30 chairs. The jet ski garage and the surrounding areas will be sacrificed to give the public visibility into all technical installations. After being rebuilt into an R&D-vessel, the boat will mainly be used for information work concerning revolutionary technology in the maritime sector. The plan is also for the boat to be rented out as a conference space for businesses, schools and organizations.

The technology

Fuel cell = the heart of the vessel

The vessel's propulsion will be powered by a fuel cell. Simply put, the fuel cell creates energy that can temporarily be stored in a battery pack. The sum of this will give energy to two powerful electric motors that, in turn, propel the boat. To understand the concept a bit more, we can dive deeper into the functioning of the fuel cell.

The electrodes in a fuel cell consist of porous carbon with a thin layer of platinum against the membrane. The electrodes are supplied with hydrogen (H2) on one side, and oxygen (O2) on the other side. Oxygen is extracted from the air, while hydrogen is supplied from tanks with completely pure hydrogen. Hydrogen can be stored liquefied or as gas under pressure, which in turn affects energy density. In the first round, the vessel will have tanks with hydrogen under pressure.

The porous carbon allows the oxygen and hydrogen to move towards the platinum layer. The platinum allows the oxygen molecules to divide into two oxygen atoms, and that the hydrogen molecule on the other side divides into a hydrogen nucleus and in electrons. The oxygen atoms will then pull the hydrogen atoms towards them. The membrane only lets through hydrogen atoms. By installing a live circuit between the two electrodes, the electrons can also move over on the other side. When the hydrogen atoms and electrons have come across on the same side as the oxygen atoms, they react with each other and form water (H2O). This water can be transported away. The electrons' movement between the electrodes produces electricity and it is this energy we will use for the propulsion of the vessel.

Progress and solution.

There have been conducted some small-scale experiments in the maritime sector using similar technology in other places in the world previously. However, seeing that Norwegians are at the forefront regarding expertise in this technology we are confident that this fuel-cell project can be groundbreaking in its effects. When it comes to the specific effects of the technology some things are kept confidential for the time being. We can, however, reveal some of the fundamentals of the principles behind the propulsion of the vessel:

The technology

Fuel cell = the heart of the vessel

The vessel's propulsion will be powered by a fuel cell. Simply put, the fuel cell creates energy that can temporarily be stored in a battery pack. The sum of this will give energy to two powerful electric motors that, in turn, propel the boat. To understand the concept a bit more, we can dive deeper into the functioning of the fuel cell.

The vessel's propulsion will be powered by a fuel cell. Simply put, the fuel cell creates energy that can temporarily be stored in a battery pack. The sum of this will give energy to two powerful electric motors that, in turn, propel the boat. To understand the concept a bit more, we can dive deeper into the functioning of the fuel cell.

The electrodes in a fuel cell consist of porous carbon with a thin layer of platinum near the membrane. The electrodes are supplied with hydrogen (H2) on one side, and oxygen (O2) on the other side. Oxygen is extracted from the air, while hydrogen is supplied from tanks with completely pure hydrogen. Hydrogen can be stored liquefied or as pressurized gas, which, in turn, affects the energy density. In the initial round of testing, the vessel will have tanks with compressed hydrogen.

The porous carbon allows the oxygen and hydrogen to move towards the platinum layer. The platinum allows the oxygen molecules to divide into two oxygen atoms, and that the hydrogen molecule on the other side divides into a hydrogen nucleus and electrons. The oxygen atoms will then pull the hydrogen atoms towards them. The membrane only lets through hydrogen atoms. By installing a live circuit between the two electrodes, the electrons can also move over on the other side. When the hydrogen atoms and electrons have come across on the same side as the oxygen atoms, they react with each other and form water (H2O). This water can then be transported away. The electrons' movement between the electrodes produces electricity and it is this energy that is used for the propulsion of the vessel.

Progress and solution.

There have been conducted some small-scale experiments in the maritime sector using similar technology in other places in the world previously. However, seeing that Norwegians are at the forefront regarding expertise in this technology we are confident that this fuel-cell project can be groundbreaking in its effects. When it comes to the specific effects of the technology some things are kept confidential for the time being. We can, however, reveal some of the fundamentals of the principles behind the propulsion of the vessel:

  • The fuel cell will be the heart of the boat.

  • Hydrogen gas will be compressed and stored in several cylinder tanks set in a rack.

  • The fuel cell will suck air in and emit clean water as it's only discharge.

  • To reach enough power in a fuel cell, several PEM cells are stacked together. In this case, several fuel cells are probably needed.

  • Fuel cells create electrical energy controlled via a Power Management System that is also powered from the battery pack.

  • The total energy is transferred via an engine control unit which in turn receives signals from the steering position on board of the vessel.

  • When the captain powers the boat forward, the desired force is sent to two powerful electric motors that power two propellers on straight shafts, creating the thrust that moves the vessel forward.

  • The fuel cells will be able to charge the battery for later propulsion, but also for on-board power consumption so that we can avoid using polluting diesel generators.